Posts Tagged ‘OldTips’

A flexible hack to making correct curves with flexi-track

0 Hacks | Intermediate | tips No Comments

flexible track template hackIf you use flexible track but don’t have Tracksetta templates this tip will save lots of frustration. Read Now

flexible track template hack

If you use flexible track but don’t have Tracksetta templates this tip will save lots of frustration. Updated:27/10/17

The £35 model railway challenge: project history

0 Projects | The £35 Model Railway No Comments

drawing model railwayIn the summer of 2017, I set myself a challenge to see if a model railway could be built for £35.   Read Now

In the summer of 2017, I set myself a challenge to see if a model railway could be built for £35.   Updated:14/12/17

Making Statues for Town and City scenes

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This tip, sent in by Bill Hughes, is possibly the easiest I’ve heard but it’s great for making statues.

For OO scale railways, take a soft drink bottom top and cut it in half (so it’s shorter). Next bye an O scale figure and glue to it the bottle cap. That’s it.

For N scale, use a smaller bottle top (or a toothpaste lid) to make the plynth and then use OO scale figures.

Paint them grey (for concrete/stone or dark brown for bronze) and you have a statue.

Bill said he got this from a friend in the 70s so where it originally came from is unknown but it’s a simple, effective, idea for adding interest to parks, recreation grounds and traffic islands.

This tip, sent in by Bill Hughes, is possibly the easiest I’ve heard but it’s great for making statues. For OO scale railways, take a soft drink bottom top and cut it in half (so it’s shorter). Next bye an O scale figure and glue to it the bottle cap. That’s it. For N scale, […]

Hiding the gap between baseboards

0 Intermediate | tips No Comments

If you have portable baseboards and want to hide the gap between them when the layout is joined up this tip I saw on an exhibition layout could be just the answer. Read Now

If you have portable baseboards and want to hide the gap between them when the layout is joined up this tip I saw on an exhibition layout could be just the answer.